Minimalist Wallet Update - Wrap Wallet Has It All

I've been using the wrap wallet for the better part of a month. Why only a month given I backed wrap wallet in Nov 2013? because Kickstarter that's why. If you want one, I suggest some patience as it seems they still have a bit of a queue.

I really like the wrap wallet. The build quality is great. I went with the black leather / red stitching which has a classic leather wallet look with a bit of accent color via the red. Despite thinking quite a bit about wallets, I have been surprisingly delighted by the experience of using the wrap wallet.

I described my want for a minimalist wallet in previous posts here and there. The Dizimio was my main wallet. It is a great aluminum / elastic band wallet which I used regularly for a year. The downfall was cash usage which simply didn't work for me. If you are simply using cards, I still recommend this and the Dizmio elastic band has been very resilient for me.

The wrap wallet has changed my mind on cash handling in minimalist wallets. I had said that cash sets the minimum size to a folded bill vs. the size of a credit card. I am happy to say the wrap wallet has changed my thinking on this completely. The wrap wallet hits all my needs. Separately, the wrap design is a clever way that minimizes the layers of leather keeping the size near the ideal size of a credit card in its foot print without being to thick.

Cash handling is almost perfect. Your cash is not visible in normal wallet usage. When you need to use cash, it is easy to get out some or all of your money in a reasonably discreet way. Importantly, I can quickly jam my change in the wallet.

As the wrap wallet is made of leather, I suspect there will be some loosening and wear over time. This has happened with all my wallets aside from the aluminum based Dizmio. Beyond this, the wrap wallet doesn't have a down side.

Auto-filing from Outlook for Mac

Why would I go back to Outlook?

For number of reasons, I am unfortunately going back to using Outlook on my work machine. I was able to go with Mail and, for the past year, BusyCal. It was great except for Exchange. Turns out that Exchange is pretty vital to the whole experience of Email and Calendar in my work-life. Exchange has problems all on its own. There are issues at work between even the different versions of office on PC's. Macs bring more issues. BusyCal isn't the issue. If I could still use BusyCal, I'd probably not make the switch. I lost access to BusyCal as it seems to have fallen off the corproate whitelist for access to Exchange. So much of my issue is with Calendar. I've had multiple issues with calendar items simply not syncing with Exchange. The final straw was moving a meeting on Calendar and having the series disappear! With any of my more important meetings and meetings with large distribution lists, I had been opening Outlook to manage these. So to answer my own questions, I have a lack of confidence in Calendar syncing properly and to manage an Exchange based connection.

Switching Back

I've been keeping the Outlook option open all along so it was simple to switch over except with 2 issues. First, I didn't have my auto-filing scripts set up for Outlook. Second, my archives from Mail won't import into outlook (after exporting in .mbox format). I won't deal with this at the moment.

I missed my auto filing scripts immediately and have adapted the script. I miss BusyCal daily and am reduced to hoping the next Office for Mac improves.

Script Update

Applescript support for Office for Mac is very good so this wasn't a problem beyond my lack of experience at scripting Outlook. Ultimately, this was solvable and the results are below. The script replaces my Mail script and does what I've described previously.

Dual Stream Filing Approach

I took the opportunity to set up a second script that auto tags and puts the document on the desktop (with Hazel). The reason for this is that I save too many files which does often complicate the process of me finding files quickly. So my approach is to have a "curated" pile of files that go through the desktop and then the balance of files in a separate pile that go through the inbox. I'm much more likely to be looking for the files that I've been working with on the desktop. With Tembo, I can target a search easily for either set of files.

The key to this is Hazel. The scripts simply save the files to two different nested folders based on the senders name. From here, Hazel tags them using dynamic tags and either puts them on the desktop if they are from one set of nested folders or my inbox for the others. Not the most elegant solution but since its really just a bunch of empty folders most of the time, its not an issue.

The Script

also can be found my github repository.

– set up the attachment folder path
tell application “Finder”
    set folderName to “Attachments”
    set homePath to (path to home folder as text) as text
    set attachmentsFolder to (homePath & folderName) as text
    – display dialog attachmentsFolder
end tell

tell application “Microsoft Outlook”

set theMessages to selection
repeat with eachMessage in theMessages

    -- set the sub folder for the attachments to the first part of senders email before a period
    -- All future attachments from this sender will the be put here.

    set theSender to sender of eachMessage
    set theAddress to address of theSender
    -- display dialog theAddress

    set AppleScript's text item delimiters to "."
    set senderName to text item 1 in theAddress
    set subFolder to senderName
    -- display dialog senderName



    -- use the unix /bin/test command to test if the timeStamp folder  exists. if not then create it and any intermediate directories as required
    if (do shell script "/bin/test -e " & quoted form of ((POSIX path of attachmentsFolder) & "/" & subFolder) & " ; echo $?") is "1" then
        -- 1 is false
        -- display dialog attachmentsFolder & "/" & subFolder
        do shell script "/bin/mkdir -p " & quoted form of ((POSIX path of attachmentsFolder) & "/" & subFolder)

    end if

    try
        -- Save the attachment
        repeat with theAttachment in eachMessage's attachment

            set originalName to name of theAttachment
            set savePath to attachmentsFolder & ":" & subFolder & ":" & originalName
            try
                save theAttachment in file (savePath)
            end try
        end repeat
        --on error msg
        --display dialog msg
    end try



    -- set theArchiveMailboxName to "Processed"
    -- if (mail folder theArchiveMailboxName exists) = false then
    -- make new mail folder with properties {name:theArchiveMailboxName}
    --   end if
    -- repeat with aMessage in theMessages
    --  move aMessage to mail folder theArchiveMailboxName
    -- end repeat


end repeat

end tell

Update to Autofiling Script

A reader asked about altering the autofiling script talked about here to capture the name of the sender rather than the parsed bit I was using. As I had a note from Mark Hunte on a simpler way to execute the script that he sent when I first posted this. As my script is still working for me, I'd not changed it. But this has been on the list of things to try out so several weeks later I got some time and the update was indeed easy. The script is below and will save the files from an email to a nested folder structure based on the sender name.

Github repository is here - look at the Autofiling-Email-Attachments Branch

Here is what Mark ultimately suggested:

set theExtractAddress to extract name from (sender of eachMessage) set subFolder to do shell script "echo " & theExtractAddress & " |awk -F@ '{print $1}' |awk -F. '{print $1}'"

I didn’t do much of any testing at all on this so please comment or send me a note if you find some errors.

– Adapted from a copyrighted script by Mark Hunte 2013
– http://www.markosx.com/thecocoaquest/automatically-save-attachments-in-mail-app/
– Changed script to parse out the first part of the email address as the folder name, eliminated time stamp folder
– Changed to run as triggered script vs email rule
– explanation of what and why at scrubbs.me

– set up the attachment folder path

tell application “Finder” set folderName to “Attachments” set homePath to (path to home folder as text) as text set attachmentsFolder to (homePath & folderName) as text end tell

tell application “Mail”

set theMessages to selection
repeat with eachMessage in theMessages

    -- set the sub folder for the attachments to the first part of senders email before a period
    -- All future attachments from this sender will the be put here.
    -- parse email name by @ and . to get to first part of email name

    -- updated script with suggestion from Mark at markosx.com
    -- Just wanted to give you another tip. You can extract the address without the 
    -- "fullname < email@address > " format by using the "extract address from" command.
    -- then altered to get at the name at request of reader at scrubbs.me

    set theExtractAddress to extract name from (sender of eachMessage)
    set subFolder to do shell script "echo " & theExtractAddress & " |awk -F@ '{print $1}' |awk -F. '{print $1}'"


    -- use the unix /bin/test command to test if the timeStamp folder  exists. if not then create it and any intermediate directories as required
    if (do shell script "/bin/test -e " & quoted form of ((POSIX path of attachmentsFolder) & "/" & subFolder) & " ; echo $?") is "1" then
        -- 1 is false
        do shell script "/bin/mkdir -p " & quoted form of ((POSIX path of attachmentsFolder) & "/" & subFolder)

    end if
    try
        -- Save the attachment
        repeat with theAttachment in eachMessage's mail attachments

            set originalName to name of theAttachment
            set savePath to attachmentsFolder & ":" & subFolder & ":" & originalName
            try
                save theAttachment in file (savePath)
            end try
        end repeat
    end try
end repeat

– adapted from script by Ben Waldie at www.peachpit.com/blogs/blo…

    set theArchiveMailboxName to "Processed"
    if (mailbox theArchiveMailboxName exists) = false then
        make new mailbox with properties {name:theArchiveMailboxName}
    end if
    repeat with aMessage in theMessages
        move aMessage to mailbox theArchiveMailboxName
    end repeat

end tell

Github Repositories

I put a few of my scripts up on Github. This should allow folks to be able to see the latest scripts without having to dig through the site to find them.

I have had a Github account for a while without really knowing much about Git or version control. Mainly because I don't program or develop software with any significant skills.

However, I am interested in learning more about this sort of stuff. So I dove into it and am slowly putting my applescripts on Github. I've also tried to do some updates to the scripts within the Git functionality. So you can see some of the changes I made in updating a couple of the scripts.

Swift - Can it make me a programmer?

The Apple Keynote was pretty exciting and I was really surprised at the announcement of the new language Swift. I saw a few tweets about people excited to try Swift out as a way to finally make a breakthrough in learning programming. As someone who has worked his way through a couple of the Big Nerd Ranch books and was currently in the middle of a great video on Lynda.com on Object Oriented Programming , I must admit I was of the same mind. After a bit of poking around on it, it's certainly much simpler than objective-C syntax. However, it is not going to suddenly make me able to code more useful or complex apps. I simply haven't yet got the hang of object oriented concepts. I'm stuck with old Basic procedural thoughts and can't seem to get past the basics on OSX or iOS apps. The playground is fun and I can manipulate strings with the best of them but the whole NSRect vs CGRect and getting the views and layers to update still isn't straight forward for me. I need a helper function to convert a NSBezier path to a CGBezier path...? Still, it's fun and challenging so I'll keep at it.

I did a fair bit of the Stanford CS106A class in ITunes U about a year ago. I don't like the eclipse IDE and prefer the Mac so I was just starting to do the assignments in Objective-C before the Keynote. My thinking was if I can convert this to X-Code and Objective-C, I'll probably understand the concepts better. I was able to get the Pyramid and Target bits sorted from assignment 2 but not without a fair amount of trouble on how to get the view connected to the code. (That and how to get the width of the view in objective-C). NSColor is not at all intuitive but I digress. This week I converted the pyramid assignment to Swift without too much trouble although the color part should be simpler than NSColor.redColor().set(). Color seems like an attribute of my Rectangle and not an object on its own. I'm guessing I didn't do it the easiest way.

I think folks will really enjoy the playground features but I wouldn't say we're going to have a flood of newbies suddenly releasing Apps into the wild!

 Part of assignment 2 from Stanford's CS106A course. Where is the NSCircle class again?   Part of assignment 2 from Stanford’s CS106A course. Where is the NSCircle class again?  

 This exercise has you make a pyramid based on some given constants and make it centered on the window and stay centered as the window is resized. There's a big gap from this to Flappy Birds let alone something as simple as Drag and Drop...Swift will help but it won't get you all the way there. This exercise has you make a pyramid based on some given constants and make it centered on the window and stay centered as the window is resized. There’s a big gap from this to Flappy Birds let alone something as simple as Drag and Drop…Swift will help but it won’t get you all the way there.

Tagging All the Files with Hazel

What is Needed?

A reader sent me an email asking about a refinement to my filing system. I've had something like this on my list for a while so off I went. Because Hazel is such an awesome program, it was fairly straightforward with only two twists.

The suggestion was to tag a set of nested folders with an individual tag for each folder the file is nested in. Here is the reader's description of the system.

What would be better (I think) would be a method to apply independent tags as Hazel moved downward through a file structure. For example, if you had a file structure organized like this:

Business —> Client Name with each Client Name folder having subfolders for Correspondence, Invoices and Contracts

then files at the level of Invoices would get three separate tags: Business, the name of the Client, and Invoices. Files at the level of Client Name would get two tags: Business and the name of the Client.

Independent tags would allow you to look across multiple Clients for all Invoices - say those within a specified date range. That is not possible with the hierarchical folder structure that I describe above, but would be possible if the folder names were converted to separate tags. IMO: The ability to look at “Invoices” as a separate searchable term substantially increases the information contained within the hierarchical structure. Its value extends beyond the administrative convenience of not having to worry about folder structures.

 Reader suggestion for tagging a substructure. Accomplished via a set of 4 rules in Hazel Reader suggestion for tagging a substructure. Accomplished via a set of 4 rules in Hazel

Setting up Hazel

First, you need to set up Hazel to crawl through a folder substructure. This is described in a couple of places here on this site, Gabe at Macdrifter, and by Mr Noodle. Simply put you put this rule on the top-most folder above the level where you want your files to be tagged. In this case, we want the Business folder to be tagged so I set this rule on the next folder up which I called Testing.

 This rule makes Hazel run around in the folder substructure with some sort of coding wizardry. This rule makes Hazel run around in the folder substructure with some sort of coding wizardry.

Then you add a rule for each level of folders you want to tag. In our example, we have 3 levels...Business, Client, and Contracts / Correspondence / Invoice. So 3 rules to cover this. I had originally thought that 1 rule could do it. However, I couldn't come up with a simple way to make it work so I split the task up. Each rule uses the Subfolder Depth condition in Hazel. So, this is a good opportunity for a reader to suggest an improvment and I can link to it! That's it in a nutshell.

A few items, honestly, would be best covered in a screen cast. Namely, making nested rules in Hazel (simply hold option when pressing the + sign to add a condition) with custom tokens for tags. I'll put in a few screen shots to try and bridge the gap until I hopefully put together a screen cast. I think the screen shots should get folks most of the way there with a little trial and error. See the bottom of this post for a few screen shots on custom tokens.

 Rule for tagging files on sub level 1 Rule for tagging files on sub level 1

 Rule for tagging files on sub level 2. The second if statement is nested. Rule for tagging files on sub level 2. The second if statement is nested.

 Rule for tagging files on sub level 3 Rule for tagging files on sub level 3

 This shows the custom token detail. It is named Tag1 and matches any folder name. Then this custom token is applied to a tag via the dynamic tagging below. This shows the custom token detail. It is named Tag1 and matches any folder name. Then this custom token is applied to a tag via the dynamic tagging below.

 Here the custom token is selected to apply the tags. Here the custom token is selected to apply the tags.

Handwritten Searchable Notes in PDF from the iPad!

Yes I'm supposed to be focusing on my email project but I had a great idea yesterday that worked amazingly well. Must have been all the creativity from the MPU listener show 191. So what was the idea? I've been looking for a way to use the notes I take on my iPad searchable. The answer has been staring me in the face on my iPad for several months.

The answer is Notes plus. Its handwriting recognition is very good. It has the requisite zoom to write feature that is a must have for me. My only question is how did this approach escape me? I want to save my notes to PDF and be able to look at the handwritten scrawl and any diagrams but be able to search the text and use that text to power Hazel tricks. Notes Plus (on the appstore) enables this in a few short steps

  • use the dashed box tool to select the handwriting on your page
  • duplicate that handwriting
  • convert to text
  • simply change the text to white and transparent.

In a belts and suspenders approach, I also use the send to back command to further hide the text. Export to PDF and its searchable. Below is the tip in pictures. Last picture is me searching my PDF on my iPad in PDF Pen. In this case, I moved the "invisible text" down and PDF Pen and you can see where the text is "highlighted.

I'm quite pleased with this and will be using Hazel to look for my standard to-do mark a hand written star. Notes Plus turns my handwritten star into an asterisk. This will be a lot of fun. If you use a process like this and have tips, please let me know!

 Use the dash box selection tool to select your handwriting and tap the check mark Use the dash box selection tool to select your handwriting and tap the check mark

 Tap on the sandwich stack that appears where the checkmark was.  Duplicate the handwriting and then convert to text. Tap on the sandwich stack that appears where the checkmark was. Duplicate the handwriting and then convert to text.

 You can see even with my poor scrawl it does pretty well. Now just turn the text white and transparent before exporting and you are done. You can see even with my poor scrawl it does pretty well. Now just turn the text white and transparent before exporting and you are done.

 Here is the output in PDF Pen for iPad Here is the output in PDF Pen for iPad

MPU Episode 191

I had a lot of fun talking with David Sparks and Katie Floyd on Episode 191 of MPU. I got a chance to share some of what I do in tagging and filing. Check out my earlier posts on note-taking for both the Mac and iPad which is also something I spend a fair bit of time doing.

I enjoy the listener shows. It's clear that there are a lot of really smart people doing some really clever things to make their work easier and more enjoyable. I pick up tips from the show every week. This one is no exception and I was part of the show.

Thanks to David and Katie for having me join!

Progress on the Email Front

My latest declared project is to get out of email. This is a difficult problem for me and I've only made a bit of progress to date. The base observation that I get lost once I get into email is still the starting insight I have to work from. No solid working habits have formed but I am finding a few hints as I write this which you will see below.

The approach is simply to decouple the message from the email client. I like this approach as it then merges into my better developed filing and to be improved execution machinery. This bit of synergy with the filing system is nice and I thought I was set to make rapid progress.

The lead approach I took was simple. Drag the email to either my filing Inbox or, preferably, the project folder in my Nowbox. My filing approach is described here. When I go back to the email to work on the project, the email opens up without the full thread with the email client behind the message. This, usually, keeps me focused on the message at hand and out the email client search box. It works pretty well yet with a couple of hitches.

First, dragging to the Nowbox project folder is still enough "friction" that I often just incorrectly defer moving the email to the project folder and dump the message in my filing Inbox. So I end up processing the file two times. I don't think I realized what I was doing until I just typed this! My thoughts in dumping this into the filing Inbox were based on processing email and not overall system efficiency.

Second, I couldn't open the email on my iPad to work or process my Inbox. While the iPad is not as efficient as the laptop to process email, I do try to do a bit of mindless filing when waiting for a conference call to get up and running. I have this solved and I will talk about this below.

Due to the iPad hitch, I briefly tried printing the emails to PDF using David Sparks' command-P trick. I initially liked this approach as it takes me completely out the email client. Bit after a short time, this is all I like about this approach. The show-stopping issue is you can't reply to a PDF.

The last bit that recently clicked for me was finding Klammer on the App Store. I am looking at emails saved from MacMail and I've had no issues. The comments on The app do show a few hard feelings on the pricing of the app so decide for yourself if it might work for you.

Office on iPad is a Big Deal

I downloaded the Office apps, looked at a few reviews, and have seen some of the tweets. The short answer for those of us who live in an enterprise and Office world, this is a big deal. I opened up a couple of Powerpoint presentations that get severely mangled with alternative apps and they look marvelous.

While a lot of the Apple and Apple blogging world that eschew Word (albeit for good reason), it is the workhorse for a unbelievable amount of folks. It took me about 30 seconds opening up the apps and a few documents to push the button on the Office 365 subscription. I'm looking for Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to be in the top grossing apps shortly. Apple got its 30% cut and Microsoft sold me on the subscription model.

My recently posted converting Word to PDF automatically is obsolete.

Tag vs Folders - A Personal Epiphany

just had an insight on a way to abandon folders for tags and smart folders. This would eliminate my need to file anything. All the files go in one big pile.

I've been following discussion on tags and folders. You can see this recent post on Tags vs Folders on Academic Workflows on a Mac via David Sparks. I use folders on a project basis and agree this is a very useful way to find files. I really like the overall design that Brett Terpstra has in his system described here. I read this post by Brett when it came out and I think its been rattling around in my brain until today.

So back to the insight. Get hazel to crawl my filing cabinet and add a tag to each file with Name of the folder its in via dynamic tagging. The folder name is the project in essence but with a bit more persistence than the file simply being in a folder. One could therefore imagine the smart folder with this project name for those of us who used to the metaphor.

I can now see my way to using this project name tag to be able to sort things and not have to "file" anything. Also, I think this will work nicely with my inbox, now, outbox system. I'll only use folders as temporary holding bins.

I created a test bed of 10 files in 3 folders and a couple subfolders. Then I tag each file with the folder name. For the test, I inserted >> in front of the name so I keep this clear of my other tags. Then I created smart folders for each of the tags. Then I tag the smart file sub folders with the tag of the folder they they're in. Here it is in pictures. So excited that it finally sunk in.

 This is the test bed and the Tags assigned This is the test bed and the Tags assigned

 Here's the smart folders I created with the Tags used for the folders. Here’s the smart folders I created with the Tags used for the folders.

 It works! Here is the base folder with the contents that should be there. It works! Here is the base folder with the contents that should be there.

 Oops - cut and paste error in this folder...see below for the fix. Oops - cut and paste error in this folder…see below for the fix.

 Forgot to change this one to the right tag... Forgot to change this one to the right tag…

 Fixed! Fixed!

Automatically Convert Word Documents to PDF

UPDATE - SCRIPT HAS A BUG - DO NOT USE TO AUTOPOST TO PUBLIC SITES THE SCRIPT CAN CONVERT ALREADY OPEN WORD DOCUMENT INSTEAD OF INTENDED DOCUMENT. DESCRIBED HERE ON NOODELSOFT FORUM.

Updated thanks to Mac Power User listener Corwin Carr - MPU Episode 186 with script at MPU Evernote document

The Issue

I have issues with a lot of the Microsoft Word documents I receive at work when I open them on my iPad. The documents are often complex and the format is garbled. As always, I need to do these things securely because of confidentiality of work documents. So web services are out. Also, iPad apps that convert don't usually solve my formatting issues. What does work is saving in PDF natively from Word.

The Design of the Solution

Here's my current solution. I set up a folder on my work Box account. That folder is watched by Hazel. On seeing the Word document, Hazel runs a script to open the document in Word on my Mac and saves it as a PDF back to the Box folder.

This solution assumes that you have a copy of office for Mac, a "always on" Mac to be available to you via a synced folder on a cloud service, and the corresponding cloud app on your iPad. This could be Box or Dropbox or even your Tranporter. Since I either have my Mac with me and I can read the file natively or I'm using my iPad and my Mac is back at my desk and available, this works for me. It should work for many of you with your always on Mac Mini!

How it Works

I use the open in feature on my iPad in the mail app to upload the document to the watched folder via my Box app. After the sync occurs to my Mac, the script fires and the PDF is created. Box syncs the document to the cloud and I have my easy to read and annotate (in Notability or Notes Plus) PDF on my iPad.

An Aside

Back when I first started my Mac productivity "Hobby", I had looked for a solution on the net and found this post with a solution by spazek. I was new to Hazel and Applescript so I was stumped to get it to work. I posted something on the Hazel forums here. Alas no help for the noob. I resorted to running this as a folder action using Hazel to shuttle the files back and forth. It worked and I never got around to updating the system. Recently, someone visited the post and was looking for help to get it to work. So I dug back into the script to simplify it and use Hazel Applescript conventions.

The Details

So here's the script and a screen shot of how I have Hazel set up.

  <img src="http://ctm2.micro.blog/uploads/2019/0f50fae811.jpg" alt=""/>
-- this script adapted from post at https://discussions.apple.com/thread/3050596?start=0&tstart=0 solution by spazek
-- details on the use of this script for Hazel found a http://scrubbs.me
-- Updated with delay to solve issue as described by Corwin Carr at Mac Power Users Show 186 notes http://5by5.tv/mpu/186
-- the First two commands avoid an error where Word would be unable to get the file path. The script would ultimately run appropriately, but only after throwing the error.

tell application "Microsoft Word" to activate
delay 1

tell application "Microsoft Word" to set theOldDefaultPath to get default file path file path type documents path -- looks like we change the default path to where the document is and then set it back when we're done
try
tell application "Finder"
set theFilePath to container of theFile as text

set ext to name extension of theFile

set theName to name of theFile
copy length of theName to l
copy length of ext to exl

set n to l - exl - 1
copy characters 1 through n of theName as string to theFilename

set theFilename to theFilename & ".pdf"

tell application "Microsoft Word"
set default file path file path type documents path path theFilePath
open theFile
set theActiveDoc to the active document
save as theActiveDoc file format format PDF file name theFilename
close theActiveDoc
end tell

end tell

end try
try

tell application "Microsoft Word" to set default file path file path type documents path path theOldDefaultPath

end try


Next Quest - Stop Living in my Email

So I've updated my systems on note taking and filing with positive results. I continue to make observations in my work where I am getting bogged down. I have a classic block when I go to my email to get information like a reference to a formula or check for some context and end up side-tracked on 2 - 3 other messages that catch my eye. Opening email is a potential rat-hole for me. I don't have a lot of issues checking email a lot. I run and attend many meetings. However, when I do get some time to process emails or actually do work, this crops up. Specifically, this week I started in a task in my Now folder, (see my filing system for details) and popped over to email looking for some needed information and ten's of minutes later, I stopped when I realized I was off task in email.

This needs to stop. Early thoughts are to either copy or print to PDF the emails that have needed context, much like I would capture of file a document. This would get placed in the specific task folder in my Now Box.

One other watch-out is that I collect tasks with the clip-o-tron 3000 to omnifocus. This practice is fast in the processing phase but a potential land mine when I follow the link back to the email to get additional context as I tend to do.

All of this is counter to a brief look for email clients that are bettter and have a task manager built in. I gave boxer a look on the iphone. I know that Brett Terpstra see this post and Gabe Weatherhead at Macdrifter (see this post) have been looking a MailMate and Jeff Hunsberger at Technology Notes (see this post) have been looking a the email client situation. This was great reading and I started down this path but was stymied by the problem I described above and MS Exchange needed for work.

My conclusion is that my email options, MacMail and Outlook are a horrible place for me to focus. I want to get out to programs where I get things done.

So to summarize, I have my next quest. On with the show...

Observations and Productivity Gains - Tweaking the Autofiling Script

I continue to analyze my productivity by observing where I have little frustrations or moments of confusion in my work. My Filing System has been a net positive. However, I've noticed over time, that often I'm saving files 2 or even 3 times from my email. Once I made this observation, I tried to understand why. In this case it was simple. I would be in a hurry and saw a file in my email I needed to save, I'd activate the script and leave the email in my inbox. When I touched the email again, say to archive it, I would often hit the script again because I didn't know if I'd saved the file.

The fix is simple, I needed to move the email to a processed folder to know that I had saved the file. I tried doing this manually to maintain flexibility in where I put the email. However, this still caused friction so I decided to automate this at the end of my script.

Per my usual modus operandi, one of the first link in a google search was a post by Ben Waldie to move emails on Mail. Since Ben clearly knows his stuff. I found the key bits and jammed them in my script. See below for the new bit and the full script. Problem solved. I liked how this worked so I also added 2 separate scripts to move email I might need to a temporary holding file and those emails I know I wanted to keep. So far, I'm touching my emails fewer times.

This does require some thought because if I want to send the email to Omnifocus, I need to do this before I file and archive the email via my script.

  <img src="http://ctm2.micro.blog/uploads/2019/63d2404159.jpg" alt=""/>
-- Adapted from a copyrighted script by Mark Hunte 2013 
-- http://www.markosx.com/thecocoaquest/automatically-save-attachments-in-mail-app/
-- Changed script to parse out the first part of the email address as the folder name, eliminated time stamp folder
-- Changed to run as triggered script vs email rule
-- explanation of what and why at scrubbs.me


-- set up the attachment folder path

tell application "Finder"
set folderName to "Attachments"
set homePath to (path to home folder as text) as text
set attachmentsFolder to (homePath & folderName) as text
end tell


tell application "Mail"

set theMessages to selection
repeat with eachMessage in theMessages

-- set the sub folder for the attachments to the first part of senders email before a period
-- All future attachments from this sender will the be put here.
-- parse email name by @ and . to get to first part of email name

set subName to (sender of eachMessage)
set AppleScript's text item delimiters to "<"
set fName to text item 2 in subName
set AppleScript's text item delimiters to "@"
set fName to text item 1 in fName
set AppleScript's text item delimiters to "."
set subFolder to text item 1 in fName


-- use the unix /bin/test command to test if the timeStamp folder exists. if not then create it and any intermediate directories as required
if (do shell script "/bin/test -e " & quoted form of ((POSIX path of attachmentsFolder) & "/" & subFolder) & " ; echo $?") is "1" then
-- 1 is false
do shell script "/bin/mkdir -p " & quoted form of ((POSIX path of attachmentsFolder) & "/" & subFolder)

end if
try
-- Save the attachment
repeat with theAttachment in eachMessage's mail attachments

set originalName to name of theAttachment
set savePath to attachmentsFolder & ":" & subFolder & ":" & originalName
try
save theAttachment in file (savePath)
end try
end repeat
end try
end repeat

-- adapted from script by Ben Waldie at http://www.peachpit.com/blogs/blog.aspx?uk=Mac-Productivity-Quick-Scripts-and-Workflows--Archiving-Selected-Mail-Messages

set theArchiveMailboxName to "Processed"
if (mailbox theArchiveMailboxName exists) = false then
make new mailbox with properties {name:theArchiveMailboxName}
end if
repeat with aMessage in theMessages
move aMessage to mailbox theArchiveMailboxName
end repeat

end tell

Chromebook Sales Numbers were only for a portion of B2B Sales

What are the real sales numbers for Google's Chromebook?

I saw a number of articles about the incredible numbers on chrome books this year and thought it strange as I don't think I have seen one in the wild.

Michael Comeau, Minyanville sorts it out for me. Original posting link here

What most tech reporters don't bother to explain is that NPD clearly says its measurement base is what it calls "US commercial channels." I emailed an NPD representative to ask exactly what this means, and was told that it's comprised of "US B2B sales using distribution partners."

and boils it down to this

That's a very small piece of the overall PC and tablet pie.

He finishes with an analysis of Microsoft's Scroogled campaign.